Sex Offender Registration In Oregon

People convicted in Oregon of certain sex crimes must register with the state as sex offenders. The registration is with the Oregon State Police.

Why does Oregon require sex offenders to register?

The theory is that sex offenders are more likely to engage in recidivism (to be repeat offenders), and therefore their location in the community is important to track.

What Offenses Require Sex Offender Registration In Oregon?

Anyone convicted of a sex crime must register as a sex offender. “Sex crime” means:

  • Rape in any degree;
  • Sodomy in any degree;
  • Unlawful sexual penetration in any degree;
  • Sexual abuse in any degree;
  • Incest with a child victim;
  • Using a child in a display of sexually explicit conduct;
  • Encouraging child sexual abuse in any degree;
  • Transporting child pornography into the state;
  • Paying for viewing a child’s sexually explicit conduct;
  • Compelling prostitution;
  • Promoting prostitution;
  • Kidnapping in the first degree if the victim was under 18 years of age;
  • Contributing to the sexual delinquency of a minor;
  • Sexual misconduct if the offender is at least 18 years of age;
  • Possession of materials depicting sexually explicit conduct of a child in the first degree;
  • Kidnapping in the second degree if the victim was under 18 years of age, except by a parent or by a person found to be within the jurisdiction of the juvenile court;
  • Online sexual corruption of a child in any degree if the offender reasonably believed the child to be more than five years younger than the offender;
  • Luring a minor, if: (A) The offender reasonably believed the minor or, in the case of a police officer or agent of a police officer posing as a minor, the purported minor to be more than five years younger than the offender or under 16 years of age; and (B) The court designates in the judgment that the offense is a sex crime;
  • Sexual assault of an animal;
  • Public indecency or private indecency, if the person has a prior conviction for a crime listed in this subsection;
  • Trafficking in persons as described in ORS 163.266 (1)(b) or (c);
  • Purchasing sex with a minor if the court designates the offense as a sex crime pursuant to ORS 163.413 (3)(d), or the offense is the defendant’s second or subsequent conviction under ORS 163.413 (3)(b)(B);
  • Invasion of personal privacy in the first degree, if the court designates the offense as a sex crime pursuant to ORS 163.701 (3);
  • Any attempt to commit any of the crimes listed in paragraphs (a) to (w) of this subsection;
  • Burglary, when committed with intent to commit any of the offenses listed in paragraphs (a) to (w) of this subsection; or
  • Criminal conspiracy if the offender agrees with one or more persons to engage in or cause the performance of an offense listed in paragraphs (a) to (w) of this subsection.

How do I get off the sex offender registry in Oregon?

Certain offenses require a lifetime registration. Other select offenses allow for potential removal from the sex offender registration requirement.

ORS 163A.140 states that, “A person otherwise required to report under ORS 163A.010, 163A.015, 163A.020 or 163A.025 is not required to report, and if currently reporting is no longer required to report, if… [t]he person has been convicted of”:

  • Rape in the third degree as defined in ORS 163.355;
  • Sodomy in the third degree as defined in ORS 163.385;
  • Sexual abuse in the third degree as defined in ORS 163.415;
  • Sexual abuse in the second degree as defined in ORS 163.425;
  • Contributing to the sexual delinquency of a minor as defined in ORS 163.435;
  • Sexual misconduct as defined in ORS 163.445; or
  • An attempt to commit an offense listed above, or a conviction based on a finding of guilty except for insanity of an offense listed above.

Relief may also be available if:

  • The person has been found to be within the jurisdiction of the juvenile court for having committed an act that if committed by an adult would constitute an offense listed in paragraph (a)(A), (B) or (D) of this subsection; or the person is paroled to this state under ORS 144.610 after being convicted in another United States court of a crime that would constitute an offense listed in paragraph (a) of this subsection; or
  • The person is less than five years older than the victim, the victim’s lack of consent was due solely to incapacity to consent by reason of being less than a specified age, the victim was at least 14 years of age at the time of the offense or act, the defendant hasn’t been convicted of any other sex crimes, and the court enters an order relieving the person of the requirement to report under ORS 163A.145 or 163A.150.”
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